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SINGLE REVIEW: “LUST OVER YOU” BY GENIE GENIE

Theatrical psych-rock project Genie Genie presents sharp, focused songwriting on the entrancing debut single “Lust Over You”.



The latest project of former Honey Arcade drummer Louie “Tiss” Tissiman, Genie Genie is a musical venture I’ve been looking forward to for a while now. While they haven’t had a gig yet, I’ve been vaguely familiar with Tiss’s eccentric stylings both in terms of aesthetic and musical taste and had heard bits and pieces about how he’d been experimenting with exotic and broken instruments over at Olympic Hall Studios in London. That combined with the news that he would be taking the music to stages with a five-piece setup as soon as live music can return definitely caused my eyes and ears to perk up and point in his direction. Unsurprisingly, when I finally got to listen to the project’s debut single, I was eager to listen to it, write about it, and share it wherever I could.


Louie “Tiss” Tissiman as Genie Genie


The track itself, if you haven’t gathered by now, is an unusual one. Psychy, eccentric, and yet surprisingly accessible, “Lust Over You” is an interesting bridge between Tiss’s past as the drummer for an indie band and his fascinations with the avant-garde. Droning sitars (or something like a sitar), squelchy synths, and vocals drenched in reverb bring in the track and let you know what to expect over the next three and a half minutes of the song. As energetic drums come in at around one minute, the track shifts gears and really takes off. While it never lets go of the ideas laid out in the reverb-soaked intro, staccato guitar stabs and the soaring vocals help provide a charge that almost feels like a live performance in your ears on demand.


Unlike other songs that fall into the umbrella of psych music, “Lust Over You” manages to avoid a lot of the common trappings of the genre. In contrast to much of the music that birthed the genre, Genie Genie never allows itself to be self-indulgent and linger on passages for minutes on end and unlike some of its contemporaries, it doesn’t accept a production style that just fades into the background like a beige wallpaper. It is a short and focused venture that doesn’t shy away from making a bashful statement. While there are faults, like the generic trippy lyrics about the flow of time, I definitely leave the song knowing that Genie Genie will be an interesting project to see grow.



Writing by Varun Govil

Photography by Louie Tissiman


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